Faculty and Graduate Fellows

Graduate Fellows

Jeffery Berryhill

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Bio: Jeff Berryhill is a third-year student in the History Department at Rutgers. Prior to arriving at Rutgers, Jeff earned an MA in Historical Studies from the New School for Social Research and a BA from the Evergreen State College. His research interests include late twentieth century American political economy, public health & the provision of care, and social movements & protest. 

 

 

 


Kathryn Coniglio

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Bio: Kathryn Coniglio is a 4th year PhD candidate and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in clinical psychology. Her research program centers on anorexia nervosa and behaviors related to extreme weight loss, such as pathological exercise. She also serves as co-chair of the Early Career Special Interest Group within the Academy for Eating Disorders. 

 

 

 


Joanna Federico

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Bio: Joanna is a second-year history PhD student at Rutgers. She holds a BA from the University of Notre Dame and an MA in History from the University of Louisville. Her research focuses on the history of public health with particular emphasis on women, children and adolescents in the late twentieth century United States. Joanna has previously investigated the influence of collective memory on breast feeding advocacy. She is currently examining the science and politics behind youth violence prevention efforts developed by Congress and various agencies of the federal government in the wake of Columbine and other mass school shootings in the late 1990s.

 

 

 


Aaron MartinBlank person photo edited

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Bio: Aaron’s research examines the social construction of existential threats and potential negative futures, the organizations and institutions that shape public understandings of these threats, and the effects of these understandings on policy and behavior. He is interested in the apocalyptic endings we create and why, and in imagining alternative perspectives for moving into the future.

Prior to Rutgers, Aaron spent six years building partnerships between government, philanthropic actors, and the social sector as a human rights and global development practitioner in Washington, D.C. He received his B.A. in English and Education from Houghton College.

 

 


Amadi Iruka Ozier

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Bio: Amadi Ozier is a PhD Candidate in English Literature. Her dissertation explores the use of humor in African-American literature as a technology of discipline, producing alternative forms of black social thought. Her work often examines the intersections between humor and violence in American cultural production, focusing in particular on blackface minstrelsy and lynching mobs as two endemically American cultural art-forms.

 

 

 


Jayme Schlesinger

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Bio: Jayme Schlesinger is a doctoral candidate in the Political Science department at Rutgers University. Her research focuses on terrorist decision-making and the effectiveness of terrorism, often within the context of religiously motivated terrorism. Her dissertation studies the effectiveness of terrorism by breaking down public responses to terrorist attacks and highlighting the role of public responses in shaping states’ counter terrorism policies.

 

 

 


Lisette Varon Carvajal

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Bio: Lisette Varón-Carvajal is a PhD Candidate in history at Rutgers, studying the history of popular medicine in Colombia during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Her dissertation project titled “A World with no Doctors: Gender and Race in the History of Popular Medicine in Colombia 1700-1850” investigates the lives and medical practices of unlicensed healers, surgeons, and midwives, and analyzes the role of gender and race in the production of medical knowledge. Lisette received her BA from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, and she has worked in feminist and governmental organizations on topics of sexual and domestic violence in Colombia. She is also a host of the New Books Network. 

 

 


Hannah Groch-Begley

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Bio: